Optimal Quantitative TOF Monitoring — Electrodes Matter Too

Why is neuromuscular transmission (NMT) monitoring (also known as TOF Monitoring) needed? Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) are routinely used in general anaesthesia to facilitate intubation, ventilation and muscle relaxation.1 The use of NMBAs is considered a double-edged sword, however, since although it facilitates anaesthesia and surgery, it is also associated with significant postoperative morbidity due…

Quantitative Neuromuscular Monitoring in the Operating Room, PACU, and ICU: Acceleromyography vs Electromyography

Standard anaesthesia practice involves the use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) to facilitate intubation as well as improve surgical conditions by enabling muscle relaxation during the surgical procedure. Whenever NMBAs are given during anaesthesia, it is mandatory to monitor the degree of neuromuscular blockade (NMB).1 This can be done using subjective or objective methods of…

Objective NMT Monitoring in the ICU

Drug-induced neuromuscular blockade is often used in anesthesia to enable endotracheal intubation, optimize surgical conditions, and assist with mechanical ventilation in patients who have reduced lung performance. Neuromuscular blocking drugs, or agents (NMBAs), act by inhibiting signal transduction at the motor end plate, thus resulting in reversible paralysis of skeletal muscles. The use of NMBAs…

Sugammadex vs Neostigmine: How the Effective Use of Sugammadex Reduces Costs

Sugammadex vs Neostigmine: How the Effective Use of Sugammadex Reduces Costs Postoperative residual curarization (PORC) frequently occurs following anesthesia and may be associated with the development of pulmonary complications, such as labored breathing, hypoxemia, and aspiration pneumonia. It may also result in a postoperative reduction in muscle strength that can cause an increase in recovery…

Stimpod Neuromuscular Monitor with acceleromyographic sensor cable

The Cost of Postoperative Respiratory Adverse Events

The Cost of Postoperative Respiratory Adverse Events Respiratory impairment following general anaesthesia can pose a significant problem. Adverse and critical respiratory events (AREs and CREs) have been responsible for increased morbidity and mortality. The main cause of AREs after surgery is related to the use of neuromuscular blockers (NMBAs) during general anaesthesia. The action of…